WSD-F20
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WSD-F20 Development Story

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12:05 AT THE TOP

On the other side of a rough section is another world.
The climbers make a circuit of two different peaks, enjoying the beautiful view.

Though they set out with a light step, the climbers eventually start to feel signs of fatigue coming on. Hunger reaches its peak and backpacks seem to be getting heavier, making this the most difficult par6t of the trek. Navigating a very steep slope or a long series of slippery rocks under these conditions can further sap depleted energy and emotions. We had to be careful of our footing and use both hands to advance step-by-step, each minute feeling like 10 or even 20.

At that point MOMENT SETTER the climbers get the good news that there were only 99 meters left to their goal. Being so close seemed to give them a second wind and the motivation to keep going to the top.

TAKESHI OKADA: Though it is possible to check your location on a map and manually calculate how much of an altitude change remains before reaching your goal, doing so becomes more of a chore when you are fatigued from trekking. That's when MOMENT SETTER's auto notification function really comes in handy. You can configure detailed notification conditions to suit the mountain you are trekking.

Just as we were in the middle of tackling a particularly difficult section, we got a notification that we were 99 meters from our goal.
Just as we were in the middle of tackling a particularly difficult section, we got a notification that we were 99 meters from our goal.

Just as we were in the middle of tackling a particularly difficult section, we got a notification that we were 99 meters from our goal.

After finally getting past the difficult section, the climbers arrive at the Tsukubasancho Station terminal cable car terminal (Miyukigahara). There are food and souvenir shops, and an observation platform in the square at the station. A cable car ride here from the foot of the mountain is about eight minutes, making this option popular among those who come with children or pets. The square is crowded with a large number of sightseers and climbers.

Taking a rest on the Miyukigahara observation platform.

Taking a rest on the Miyukigahara observation platform.

We could check the directions of everything that was visible from the observation platform.

We could check the directions of everything that was visible from the observation platform.

The observation platform provides a view of the Kanto Plain, and after checking which way is west with the watch's compass our climbers found that they could see Tokyo's Sky Tree and the Shinjuku skyline. They say you can even see Mt. Fuji when visibility is good.

TAKESHI OKADA: The compass, altimeter, barometer, and other functions built in to the WSD-F20 can be instantly accessed using the TOOL button. Of these, the compass comes in handy when you want find a distant mountain, building, or other object on a map. The compass is great to have a long when viewing the scene from a skyscraper, observation platform, or other location.

Mt. Tsukuba is what is known as twin-peaked, which means a single mountain that has two peaks named Mt. Nantai and Mt. Nyotai, which are along the same ridge. From here our climbers set out on a circular route to both peaks, which takes about an hour at a slow pace. Trekking Mt. Tsukuba is like getting two for one.

First stop is Mt. Nantai, followed by a return to Miyukigahara for a short lunch break, during which the weather improves. After that they head out to Mt. Nyotai.
There are shrines at each of the peaks, and behind the shrines are areas with splendid views. Mt. Nyotai is the highest point on Mt. Tsukuba, and from there you can enjoy a beautiful 360-degree view of Lake Kasumigaura to the southeast, the mountains of Nikko, and more.

From Miyukigahara, we set off for Mt. Nantai.  ACTIVITY shows color codes trails according to their altitudes.

From Miyukigahara, we set off for Mt. Nantai. ACTIVITY shows color codes trails according to their altitudes.

From Miyukigahara, we set off for Mt. Nantai.  ACTIVITY shows color codes trails according to their altitudes.
The sweeping panorama of the Kanto Plain left us spellbound.

The sweeping panorama of the Kanto Plain left us spellbound.

We used Location Memory to register marks on the map to commemorate our climb to the top.

We used Location Memory to register marks on the map to commemorate our climb to the top.

This is the app we used!

TOOL IconTOOL

The TOOL app is a popular function that is carried over from the WSD-F10. It can be used to measure and display various types of information about natural phenomena, which is essential when engaged in outdoor adventuring. The TOOL app provides you with timely notification of information you need, as well as access to a variety of different activities in addition to trekking.

  • TOOL 1
  • TOOL 2
  • TOOL 3
  • TOOL 4

From left to right: Altimeter, Compass, Barometer, Sunrise/Sunset Times. (Above are simulated screen images.)